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Clinical & Medical Nutritionists and Dietitians Careers

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that employment growth for dietitians is expected to be faster than average from 2012 through 2020. This may be due in part to the increased interest in healthy eating as a way to help prevent illness. This potential growth may also happen because the Baby Boom generation is reaching retirement age and will need extra care. Long-term care homes and in-home caregivers may seek the assistance of dietitians to help with wellness programs for this population of people.

Areas Of Practice

Medical Nutritionists work mostly in hospitals, outpatient and community clinics, long and short-term care facilities and research institutes. Much like Clinical Nutritionists, Medical Nutritionists are trained primarily in anatomy, physiology and biology. Their job is to ascertain the root causes or many chronic diseases and prescribe diet and lifestyle changes that will benefit their patients.

What are the daily tasks for clinical Nutritionists and Dietitians?

According to the National Academy of Science, “95% of chronic diseases are caused by diet, the environment and lifestyles factors. Genetics accounts for five percent of these diseases.”

A Clinical Nutritionist uses the latest biomedical and physiological information and research to assess individual patient’s needs. From this analysis, they are able to prescribe the proper nutrition and diet according to that individual’s optimum biological function. According to the US Clinical Nutrition Certification Board (CNCB), Clinical Nutritionists use “case history, anthropomorphic measurements, physical signs, laboratory tests, and nutrition/lifestyle analysis” in order to assess an individual patients needs for dietary and nutritional optimization. From this assessment, a prescription can be made and, if needed, a proper referral to a physician or other medical professional.

Much like a Clinical Nutritionist or Dietitian, a Medical Nutritionist or Dietitian also uses biomedical and physiological information and research to assess an individual patient’s needs, prescribing that patient’s proper nutrition and diet. Both positions would work closely with doctors, nurses and research analysts.

Clinical Dietitian Salaries for Nutritionist Graduates

CareerAnnual Median WageProjected Number of New JobsProjected Job Growth Rate
Dietitians and Nutritionists59,4109,60014.1
Source: 2016 Occupational Employment Statistics and 2016-26 Employment Projections, Bureau of Labor Statistics, BLS.gov.

Dietician Degree Programs

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